Friday, May 22, 2015

The Final Push to Finish the Front Rose Border

Today's weather has been cool (in the 70s), breezy, and perfect for working as long as it takes to finish the last little bit of the mixed rose border in our front yard.  Remove the weeds and rogue grass that had taken over the space, dig and set the edging stones, install landscape fabric, plant roses, add irrigation emitters, then mulch.  Sounds like a lot, and it was.

After I'd been at it for a little while, I remembered to take my phone out of my pocket to capture a photo to show what the area sort of looked like before I started.



I ran out of steam at about 4:00 this afternoon.  The only thing on my list that I didn't get to was the mulch and a couple of quick pieces of landscape fabric.  This is the easy part, and my husband said that he will do it for me tomorrow.  He's such a sweetheart!



I'm thrilled that this border is so close to being finished, AND that I have four more roses out of their pots and into the ground!  They're really small now, but they will grow big and strong in no time.



Because I know you're going to ask ... the new roses are:
1.  'George Cuvier', Bourbon rose, before 1849.
2.  Unregistered Yellow Seedling, a back-up copy of a rose that I grew from seed.
3.  'Fabvier', China rose, 1829
4.  "Ruth's Tiny Polyantha", found rose from the Tufton collection.
(the rose on the fence is 'Dr. W. Van Fleet'.)

All of my reclamation efforts for the past few months have been well worth it, because the roses in the areas I've worked in look so good.  The most important thing is that I am doing this for ME and, as a result, I am enjoying my garden more than I ever have before.

6 comments:

  1. That is going to be so fantastic when it is done. If I had enough money I would pay you to come and DO MY ROSES for me! lol Maybe at my next house when we downsize. I love your knowledge about roses! xo Diana

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    1. Diana, darling, I have had countless offers from folks asking me to either design or build and maintain their rose gardens. Not my thing ... not even for you, and you know how much I think of you. This garden of mine is a laboratory, where there are experiments with rousing success or horrible failure. As years have gone by and I learn more about gardening on THIS piece of dirt, the successes are more likely (thank goodness). I will, though, be happy to continue what I'm doing so you can learn what to do with roses on YOUR piece of dirt.

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  2. You are such a hard worker and I'm so envious!

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    Replies
    1. It was easy to work hard yesterday, because the weather was so gorgeous. Definitely a very unusual day for this time of year. As a result, I worked TOO hard and I hit the wall at about 3:30. At least I had this lovely area of the garden to gaze upon while I was in my stupor for the rest of the day.

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  3. As always Connie, you are a hard worker and an inspiration.

    Thank you for sharing through your blog, photos, your experience and knowledge.

    FlowerLady

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  4. These pics will grow more precious by the year. But you know that.

    XO T

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