Sunday, May 20, 2018

Sunday Snapshot: My New-To-Me DSLR

Last week, I was at a loss about what to do with my malfunctioning Nikon D70.  I talked to a photographer friend about it, and he offered a most profound observation.   He said, "It's going to be hundreds of dollars to repair your D70 ... used ones are about $75 online."

Why didn't I think of that???

I surfed around online, looking at used D70s, but hesitated.  Something didn't feel quite right.  There were things about my old camera that I would improve, namely the display screen.  A bit of research and reading and opening up my search criteria led me to this:



Meet my new-to-me Nikon D90, fresh out of the box!  It has a better processor than my D70, a larger screen, and it can use all of my lenses.  It's old technology, minted in 2006 or so, but I'm perfectly comfortable with that.  I wasn't comfortable with the prospect of paying a lot of money for a camera that I use only occasionally, which is what would have happened if I had shopped for a new camera.  (To be honest, the thought of that made me queasy.)  

That thing in this post I said about rose season passing me by while I was without a 'good' camera ... 

Nevermind.


********************
Sunday Snapshots are posts devoted to moments in time that represent glimpses into everyday life in Hartwood, or wherever else I happen to be at the time.

Friday, May 18, 2018

Open Garden Day, 2018

Open Garden Day this year will be on Memorial Day, May 28, 2018, from 10am till 3pm.  



As you can see from the above image, it was originally scheduled for this coming Sunday.  We have had rain every day so far this week ... the ground is saturated, the garden is a bog, the roses are soggy and sad, footing is treacherous and parking in our field will be impossible.  

We hope to see you on the new date.  

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Wine and Roses Open House at Tufton Farm

This Saturday, May 19, the Thomas Jefferson Center for Historic Plants, at Tufton Farm in Charlottesville, Virginia, will hold its annual Wine and Roses Open House.  I was there for most of the day yesterday, consulting with staff, evaluating the roses in the garden, and helping to prepare for this weekend's event.  

Most of my time was spent organizing the roses in the nursery sales area.  There is a great selection of roses, most of which are rarely available except for via mail order.  

The roses available for sale are:

'Amanda Patenotte' (aka, "Portland from Glendora")
'Aviateur Bleriot'
'Baltimore Belle'
'Blush Noisette'

'Blush Noisette'


"Bremo Musk"
'Cecile Brunner'
'Climbing Cecile Brunner'
'Champneys' Pink Cluster'
'Complicata'
'Crepuscule'
'The Fairy'

'The Fairy'


'Felicite et Perpetue'
'Fewell's Noisette'
'Gardenia'

Gardenia


'Gruss an Aachen'
'Ispahan'

'Ispahan'


Lady Banks, White
Lady Banks, Yellow
'Madame Plantier'
'Marie Daly'
'Marie Pavie'

'Marie Pavie'


'Mary Washington'
Single Musk (R. moschata)
'Mutabilis'

'Mutabilis'


'New Dawn'
'Old Blush'
'Climbing Old Blush'
"Peggy Martin"
'Pompon de Bourgogne'

'Old Blush'


'Climbing Old Blush'


"Peggy Martin"


'Pompon de Bourgogne'


Prairie Rose (R. setigera)
'Pride of Washington'

'Pride of Washington'


'Princesse de Nassau'
'Redoute's Red'

'Redoute's Red'



'Rosa palustris' (Swamp Rose)
'Rose d'Amour'
'Sombrueil'
'Temple Musk'
'Tuscany'
'Veilchenblau'

'Tuscany'


Here is the event flyer, with the schedule of activities.  This year's rose speaker is my friend Peggy Cornett, Curator of Plants at Monticello.



I can't be at the event this year and I'm seriously bummed about it.  

Sunday, May 13, 2018

The Garden is Getting Glorious ... and My Camera May Be Dead

My trusty, ancient Nikon D70 is acting up.  I use it a lot during rose season to take photos of the garden in bloom.  The camera in my iPhone 8+ takes good photos, but the Nikon is better at capturing accurate, large, close-up images.  I really hope that this problem is something that can be easily sorted out.



Here are the facts:

In order to get the photo files from my camera to my computer, I download them directly from the camera to my PC, using a USB cable.  Earlier this morning, I hooked everything together, and highlighted, copied, and pasted the files like I always do.  There were about 40 photos, ... the last dozen or so came out distorted.  Corrupted files, I'm guessing.

IMG0247, looks perfect as it downloaded initially.


I deleted the wonky files from the PC, and attempted to download them again ... figuring that something went astray during the first transfer process.  This time, ALL of the files on the memory card were distorted.  They were compressed to one side and overlaid with black lines, lime green bars, and most of the frame was blank.

IMG0247 now looks like this, when viewed from the memory card.


A quick Google search and some reading on various forums indicated that the problem could be a bad memory card, faulty USB cable, or something REALLY wrong with the camera.

The easiest thing to test was the USB cable.  Tried to transfer files with another one ... same problem.

Switching out memory cards, and now I get a CHA error.  Turn the camera off, then back on, the error goes away.  I took a few test shots, which didn't write to the memory card, then the CHA error comes back.  This happened with all three of the three memory cards that I tried.  On my last attempt to transfer files to my PC, it got even worse:

Catastrophic failure is never a good thing.


Same error, and worsening chain of events, with two different USB cables and three memory cards, tells me that it's probably a camera issue.

So .... it looks like my iPhone will be my only photo-taking tool this season.  I am thankful to have it, because it really can take great photos. Folks over on Instagram saw this one that I took yesterday morning.

"Connie's Favorite Gallica" straight out of the phone, with watermark added in Photoshop.


I'm not giving up on the Nikon just yet.  It may be an easy fix.  I'll have to get a recommendation for a good camera shop and see what they say.

Friday, April 27, 2018

What's Blooming in the Garden Today?

After a few false starts, it appears that Mother Nature has decided to release us from winter's grasp and allow spring's flowers to proceed. 

Red Bleeding Heart


White Bleeding Heart


Just in time, I think, because I am SO far behind with my normal spring pruning and garden maintenance.

Variegated Solomon's Seal


Brunnera macrophylla


Part of this delay is because we had winter weather for a lot longer than usual this year.  Those of you who follow along on Instagram are aware that I have been traveling a LOT this year, which has taken me away during prime garden prep season.  Trips are finished for a few months (I think), so I have to get cracking.

Pink Lily of the Valley


Calycanthus


I was outside all day yesterday, pruning most of the Miniature Garden.  Roses in all of the other gardens are finished.  We had rain overnight, which made the garden too wet for work this morning ... perfect, though, for a quick circuit through with my camera to capture all the things in bloom.  Later this afternoon, I hope that it dries enough for me to get outside to prune the last few roses.  Weeding and mulching are next.  

Dogwood


Lilac


Speaking of roses, buds on 'Dr. E. M. Mills' are beginning to show color! 



For those who want to visit to see the roses in person, this year's Open Garden Day will be May 20, 2018, from 10am to 3pm.  Everyone is invited.  Dogs may come, too, but they must be on a leash at all times.  No flexi/retractable leashes are allowed.  


Saturday, March 17, 2018

Hey, Connie, How is Petal?

Petal is awesome, thanks for asking.



It's been five months since we adopted her.  In that time, she has settled in beautifully and has blossomed into a wonderful addition to our family. 

"Mom, can Ruby and I have a bite of that?"


sniff, sniff, sniff


"What's that cat doing back there?"


Petal loves toys.  We keep them in a large basket in the family room.  She regularly empties the basket and gathers her favorites.


Donut Cow and Green Frog.


Squeeky Jack, two bones, and an antler.


Miffy Bunny, her current favorite.


As she got comfortable with our routine, she found ways to help around the house.

Cleaning the recyclables.


Quality control inspector, while I attach the hangers to a mirror.


Dog chewy taste tester.


In true greyhound style, she spends a huge majority of her time either lounging on her bed or sound asleep.







Almost as a way of celebrating the anniversary of Petal's Gotcha Day on the 12th, a string of coincidences on Facebook led to finding and making contact with the family in Pennsylvania who adopted her mom, Marigold.  I  look forward to getting to know Marigold and her family and am excited to share Petal with them. 

Marigold's adoption photo.


It is wonderful to have Petal in our family.  Having ANY greyhound is a good thing (because I love the breed THAT much).  This particular greyhound is a perfect match for our lifestyle, habits, and mix of critters.  She accepts the cats as members of the pack, and she and Ruby get along almost perfectly.



Petal is exactly what we asked from her adoption group:  gentle, friendly, and doesn't eat cats.  She is also eager to please, curious, quiet, funny, patient, affectionate, a little bit pushy ... and perfect ... except for the 'chews on shoes' thing that developed recently.  That's okay, it helps remind us to put our shoes away where they belong.





Five months with Petal feels like she's been here forever.  In this short time, I can't imagine our family without her in it.

*************************
I often share Petal photos and videos on Instagram.  I can do it in-the-moment from my phone, and I really have come to love that.  If you want to see more of her, and the other critters, house projects, garden stuff, etc., click over there and follow hartwoodroses.

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Hello, Hellebores!

In the world of easy-care plants, Hellebores are probably my favorite.  They thrive in shade, can take dry or damp conditions, and they bloom their hearts out for months and months from late winter till late spring with a wide variety of flower colors and forms. 









The only maintenance that Hellebores require is a careful trim at this time of year, when new growth is emerging from the center of the plant, to remove last year's old foliage.  (I took these photos earlier today, while I was outside doing just that.)  I have a LOT of Hellebores, and it only took me a little over two hours to do all of them.









Most of the Hellebores in my garden are seedlings from the few named varieties that I bought at plant sales years ago.  Happy Hellebores reseed easily, and I am glad to have them spread as far as they want in the areas where they grow.  When seedlings grow where I don't want them, I dig them and move them to another spot, or I give them to friends.  I allow my shade garden to get a bit wild, so masses of seedling Hellebores (or Hostas or Italian Arum) are a good thing.









It looks like this year's Hellebore season should be a very good one.  Bloom time is just starting, with all of these flowers you see here and a LOT more still to come. 
Related Posts with Thumbnails