Sunday, November 23, 2014

Thirty Days of Mr. Rogers ... Day Twenty-Two (and Twenty-Three)

Mr. Rogers said, "If the day ever came when we were able to accept ourselves and our children exactly as we are and they are, then, I believe, we would have come very close to an ultimate understanding of what 'good' parenting means.  it's part of being human to fall short of that total acceptance --- and often far short.  But one of the more important gifts a parent can give a child is the gift of accepting that child's uniqueness."


I spent the day away yesterday, meeting friends that I don't see often.  First stop was an antique shop that I have never been to ... bought this painting to add to my collection of amateur rose paintings ... it's painted well, but it's pretty awful at the same time ... just the way I like them!


"It's not always easy for a father to understand the interests and ways of his son.  It seems the songs of our children may be in keys we've never tried.  The melody of each generation emerges from all that's gone before.  Each of us contributes in some unique way to the composition of life."


Our other stop was at Albemarle Cider Works, where they grow heritage apples and make fantastic cider.  This is what I brought home ... a mixed half-bushel of apples for eating and for pies (York, Stayman, Gold Rush, and Albemarle Pippin), two bottles of hard cider, and a half-gallon of fresh cider.


Me:  We have three daughters, all grown now.  Each of them has a very different personality than either of their sisters ... the challenge in parenting them has always been to respect those differences but not go crazy catering to each one's preferences and tendencies.  They are very close in age, and it would have seemed natural to treat them as a homogeneous unit all the time.  Not doing this allowed each of them to develop into their OWN person, while still maintaining the connection as a member of our family.

************
During the month of November, I plan to share wisdom from Mr. Rogers with you each day (from the book "The World According to Mr. Rogers") ... Mr. Rogers's words accompanied by everyday images from life here at Hartwood Manor ... this place that I am blessed to call HOME.


5 comments:

  1. I don't have children but I have three nieces. Each one is totally different and unique but the youngest one drives her mother crazy. They are always in some sort of battle and yet oddly enough, that is the one I'm closest to.
    I wish that my sister could see her as unique rather than just being a rebel.
    (Love your posts, although I haven't commented all the time. Yep, totally love Mr. Rogers thoughts.)

    ReplyDelete
  2. These words are so true and are important to remember. My children are both so different! Learning to respect their difference and let them be who they are was not always easy but vital to the well being of my children.
    hugs,
    Linda

    ReplyDelete
  3. My wish is to have that same acceptance of everyone I meet. I get to choose what I like and how I want to live, I want to be equally accepting of others' choices without thinking they somehow reflect on me. It's too easy to be critical...

    ReplyDelete
  4. We raised four kids and they are so vastly different. However, what I find most amazing, is their recollection of memories. Each has a totally different take!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Life seems to have come full circle, Connie. We taught the girls as best we could by example and now they teach us. Our brilliant smart cookies bring us joy every day.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for stopping by and reading what I share. Comments are moderated. Spam and trolls are not welcome!

Related Posts with Thumbnails