Sunday, June 14, 2015

Sunday Snapshot ... Propagation Time!

Now that the roses in my garden are past peak bloom, it is time for me to take cuttings for propagation.  When I was running the nursery, I felt the need to cater to the market and propagate the roses that customers expected to find in stock.  These were mostly old garden roses that are fairly common, ones that most rose-growing folks had heard of.  I was never comfortable with this.  The few rare and unusual roses that I rooted for sale tended to be ignored, while the familiar ones sold without much effort.


Yesterday morning's harvest of cuttings.


Now that I don't have to supply a nursery inventory anymore, I can propagate what I think is important ... roses from here and other places that are the rarest and most vital to multiply and distribute, roses that I have agreed to trade with friends, and, beginning this year, roses from the Rose Field ... the next step in my current plan to reclaim that heinous mess of a former garden.


The cuttings are now safely sitting in the north-facing window in my cool basement, where I can easily keep an eye on them.


You're probably wondering ... what roses were in this first batch of cuttings?  They are:


"Tidewater Trail" is a Hybrid China rose that I found in 2009, growing beside the fallen porch of a derelict house south of Fredericksburg, Virginia.


"Dennis's not-Anemone Rambler" is a wonderful unidentified Hybrid Setigera rose.  Dennis received it as a small plant, with a tag in the pot that said 'Anemone' ... which it obviously is not.  He shared his plant with me.


I have shown you this rose many times, "Pink Van Fleet", which is possibly the real 'Bess Lovett', that appears to be lost in the US.


'White Cap' is the best performing climber that I grow.  Most people don't know about it, though, and it is very hard to find.


"Faded Pink Monthly", a rose found by Mrs. Keays, is the first Rose Field rose that I took cuttings from.


If you want to learn how to root your own roses, THIS LINK will take you to my photo tutorial that teaches you the method that I use.

Happy Sunday, Everyone ... I'm heading outside now, to go take more rose cuttings.

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Sunday Snapshots are posts that are devoted to a moment in time that represents a slice of life in Hartwood, or wherever else I happen to be at the time.

16 comments:

  1. They are all so pretty and I'm glad you are keeping all these gorgeous Roses going strong!!
    hugs,
    Linda

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    Replies
    1. This is what I hoped to do all along, but the realities of what I had to grow in the nursery business got in the way. Now, I am finally doing what I intended to do in the beginning … preserve and propagate roses in need, and educate people about the history. Roses are part of gardens (gardens at homes and at cemeteries). Their stories fascinate me.

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  2. Oh, I love that Pink Van Fleet.
    Thank you, thank you for the link on how to root!
    I have several yellow roses and my dream is to have view of just yellow from my kitchen window!
    :D Thanks again!
    xo

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    Replies
    1. You are very, very welcome. When you try this (notice that I said "when") please let me know how it goes. As the post in the link says, this method is great for all sorts of plants that can root from cuttings. I love how simple it is ... the hardest part is the step where I have to leave the containers alone in a protected place until the cuttings produce roots. It's torture for me to resist the urge to mess with them. I compromise with status checks once a week, removing any cuttings that I find have died.

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  3. Love, love, love the shades of pink! That first one is gorgeous!

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    1. It’s weird that I don’t really do pink anywhere else in life other than my garden. I tried on a pink dress last week while shopping with my daughter … perhaps I’m softening a bit to that color.

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  4. Oh my. You've got me wanting to propagate some roses of my own. My favorite rose of this batch is "Tidewater Trail".

    All of those gorgeous petals, wow and that beautiful color. May you have 100% success.

    FlowerLady

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    Replies
    1. Great!! That’s exactly what this is supposed to do … to make you feel empowered to give it a try for yourself. If I can do it, anyone can. Just make sure that your rose is well watered ahead of time before you take your cuttings, and don’t overwater the container that the cuttings are in. If there’s condensation on the inside of the soda bottle, there should be no need for additional water.

      100% success is a dream to work toward. I’m happy with 50-75% One of the varieties that I stuck today, ‘Dancing Doll’, has a 100% failure rate so far over the years. I keep trying.

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  5. How I love your blog, Connie. I get to see both the beautiful roses and 'behind the scenes', which is almost even more interesting.
    Amalia
    xo

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    Replies
    1. This reminds me of the scene toward the end of the movie "The Wizard of Oz", where Toto pulls back the curtain, exposing the Wizard. :)

      I take kind words like yours to heart ... and they make me blush.

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  6. Hi, I'm a new follower (discovered your blog through Pinterest couple of months ago and been back reading older posts since then). Also, I'm a novice rose gardener, I just started my rose garden a year ago. I would love to have that gorgeous 'White Cap' in my garden. Would you sell one for me when it's ready next spring? Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Alma. I am always glad to make the acquaintance of anyone who loves roses!! I may or may not have a White Cap available for sale next spring. Cuttings fail, and a couple of plants are already promised in trade to friends. You can wait and hope, but that's no fun. I just did a search of my sources and found that White Cap is in stock at Rogue Valley Roses. I have ordered many roses from them over the years, and they have always sent me good plants. Here's a link for you, if you want to order it.
      https://www.roguevalleyroses.com/rose/white-cap

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  7. I love all the roses that you picked to propagate. I think almost all of my roses, except two, are out of the norm. Graham Thomas and New Dawn, first one because I love yellow roses, second, I love that it's a reliable repeat bloomer. I will one day try to start my own. I am somehow doing it without knowing it...there are three baby New Dawn near the gate...already spoken for by my daughters.

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  8. Every time you share a series of your rose photos, I will look at one and think, well, that's my favorite! Then I'll scroll to the next one and change my mind, so I can understand why you have so many roses, Connie! I also "get" why catering to the public wasn't your thing. I think everyone who interacts with the public in person or online struggles with that in some way. Kudos to you for figuring it out and going your own way. :-) I'm not a true pink gal, but I do love fuschias and hot pinks so that Tidewater Trail rose speaks to me. Love its petals and their configuration (not a proper rose term, I'm sure), too.

    Shirley

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