Sunday, October 30, 2016

Ramblers, by Anne Belovich

Ramblers are the first roses that I remember falling head-over-heels in love with.  It's not a class for the faint of heart, because many of them can easily put out canes that grow ten to twelve feet or more in a single season.  

Anyone who loves and collects Ramblers* will eventually cross paths with Anne Belovich.  She loves Ramblers, too, and has been collecting and growing them for decades ... she has what is thought to be the largest private collection of Ramblers in the world.  I have corresponded with Anne for a few years, exchanging cuttings and plants, and I met her in person at an event in Texas two years ago.  During our conversation, Anne told me that she was in the process of writing a book on Ramblers.  That book was released last month.  My copy arrived in the mail a few days ago.



Last year, Anne contacted me to ask if I would send her photos of "Pink Van Fleet", a rose I grow that she and I think may be the true 'Bess Lovett', which is lost in the US.  I was honored that she asked, and thrilled that one of my photos is in her book.



I am most surprised that, in addition to photo credit in the back of the book, I was mentioned among some very big names in the acknowledgements at the beginning of the book.



I have only had time to thumb quickly through Ramblers.  All roses in it are presented in alphabetical order, for easy use as a reference.  I can already see that this book will get a LOT of use as an important addition to my rose library ... and it stands as a reminder of a mentor who made a big impression on me and on my garden.
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* A Rambler, as I know it, is defined as a large, once-blooming climbing rose.  The American Rose Society no longer recognizes Ramblers as a distinct class of rose.  Ramblers were recently reclassified and split into separate classes based on their genetics. No matter what their new classifications, they will always be Ramblers to me.

Click HERE to order Ramblers for your own rose library.

12 comments:

  1. I love roses. Nothing can beat their fragrance. I have a big fenced patio, and I think I shall plant roses next year.
    Brenda

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    Replies
    1. Fragrant roses for your patio would be wonderful!

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  2. How cool!
    Your friendship,
    the Ramblers,
    the book,
    the acknowledgements!

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    1. It IS cool! I've been waiting for a year for this book and I am REALLY excited to finally have it.

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  3. A rosegarden without at least one rambler is not a real rosegarden I think. Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate' is my wildest growing rambler I think, I feel like Sleeping Beauty when I'm pruning her on the gazebo in spring.

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    1. I completely agree with you! Many people I talk to fail to appreciate the ramblers because they get big and flower only once. I love them for these reasons. Hundreds/thousands of flowers in the spring, and a beautiful green background in the garden for other things during the rest of the year. 'Kiftsgate' is a wonderful rose!

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  4. I've never had a good spot for a rambler. I so love them though! Thanks for sharing the book! How exciting to have your photo published! You certainly are a wonderful ambassador for roses.

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    1. Growing ramblers takes space, that's for sure ... and probably reflects a bit of a personality flaw in the grower, for wanting to take on the challenge in the first place. Just kidding. :)

      My goal whenever I talk about roses, whether it's in person, on this blog, or on Istagram, is to leave the audience feeling informed and empowered, and to dispel as many myths about growing them as I can. If I can do it, almost anyone can ... and I mean it.

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  5. What a special inclusion, Connie! It's a gorgeous rose that you captured beautifully and I love the mystery aspect of it all. After reading Janneke's comment I looked up the Kiftsgate rose and came across this description of it on another blog, "Along with the Great white shark and Bengal tiger, Rosa filipes ‘Kiftsgate’ should be avoided by all sensible human beings. It is predatory and hungry, but beautiful, like the tiger. Which is why I love it, despite the danger." LOL Glory be to the amazing ramblers! Yours certainly impressed me when I saw them. :-)

    Shirley

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    1. That description of 'Kiftsgate' is perfect! It wonderfully captures the majesty and power of a large rambler. Ramblers ask little, except for space, and they reward us with hundreds or thousands of flowers in a form that has the potential to stop traffic.

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  6. Congratulations on your acknowledgement and photo in the new book! Very exciting! I can't wait to get this book...though I may have to wait until Christmas. :)

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  7. Congrats on your being mentioned in this lovely book, and for having a photo of your roses as well.

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