Friday, January 30, 2009

Looking Back

The last two entries here have been filled with tales of winter and cold weather. Let's start something new today. We'll take a tour of the roses in the various beds throughout the garden.

Today, we'll look at some from the Hybrid Tea Bed in the front yard:

Bewitched
Hybrid Tea, Queen Elizabeth x Tawny Gold
Bred by Dr. Walter Lammerts, 1967.

Photobucket

Butterscotch
Hybrid Tea, Souvenir du Claudius Pernet x RMS Queen Mary
Bred by Joseph H. Hill Co., 1942

Photobucket

Dagmar Spath
Floribunda, sport of Lafayette
Introduced by Wirtz & Eicke in Germany, 1936

Photobucket

Dairy Maid
Floribunda, (Poulsen's Pink x Ellinor LeGrice) x Mrs. Pierre S. Dupont
Bred by LeGrice, 1957

Photobucket

Gail Borden
Hybrid Tea, RMS Queen Mary x Viktoria Adelheid
Bred by Reimer Kordes, 1957

Photobucket

Golden Ophelia
Hybrid Tea, Ophelia x Mrs. Aaron Ward
Bred by Benjamin R. Cant & Sons, 1918

Photobucket

Gruss an Coburg
Hybrid Tea, Alice Kaempff x Souvenir du Claudius Pernet
Bred by Johannes Felberg Leclerc, 1927

Photobucket

Lady Alice Stanley
Hybrid Tea, parentage unknown
Bred by Samuel McGredy II in Ireland, 1909

Lady Alice Stanley

Lyon Rose
Pernetiana/Hybrid Tea, Madame Melanie Soupert x seedling of Soleil d'Or
Bred by Joseph Pernet-Ducher, 1907

Photobucket

Ma Perkins
Floribunda, Red Radiance x Fashion
Bred by Gene Boerner, 1952

Photobucket

Nellie E. Hillock
Hybrid Tea, Golden Dawn x seedling
Bred by Verne Stone Hillock, 1934

Photobucket

Pink Gruss an Aachen
Floribunda, sport of Gruss an Aachen
Introduced by Jan Spek Nurseries, 1930

Photobucket

Poulsen's Pearl
Floribunda, Else Poulsen x seedling
Bred by Poulsen Roser A/S in Denmark, 1949

Photobucket

Snowbird
Hybrid Tea, Chastity x Louise Crette'
Bred by Hatton, 1936

Photobucket

The Doctor
Hybrid Tea, Madame J. D. Eisele x Los Angeles
Bred by F. H. Howard, 1936

Photobucket

Wagon Wheel Bright Pink
Hybrid Tea, parentage unknown
found rose

Photobucket

White Killarney
Hybrid Tea, sport of Killarney
Introduced by Waban Rose Conservatories, 1909

Photobucket

Next time, we'll look at some roses from other parts of the garden.

Friday, January 16, 2009

Br-r-r-r-r

When I got up this morning, the digital thermometer on the deck read 3.8 degrees. Those of you reading this in Montana (hi, Becky) or New England,or the Arctic Circle won’t find this temperature too remarkable. Here in Virginia, though, it’s the main topic of conversation.

Normally, I would have only a casual interest in this because garden is sleeping and I’m in the house (sitting on a radiator, no doubt) waiting for spring. This year is different, because I have the greenhouse full of rose cuttings and small plants. Roses are not tender like tomatoes or peppers, so temps below freezing for a few nights should be fine. This sort of frigid weather, however, can freeze everything solid and I could lose everything out there.

Up until the last two nights, I have been doing fine heating the greenhouse with two oil-filled electric radiators. These do a good job keeping the inside temperature at least 13 degrees above the outside temperature -- which is fine when the low temp is 20 - 25 degrees, like it usually is. With the reality of temps near zero in the forecast from earlier this week, I knew I had to add something else to the plan. I borrowed a small propane heater from my neighbor, and all has been fine. As long as I keep a steady supply of propane on hand, the greenhouse will nice and toasty.

Thursday, January 8, 2009

Winter ...

It’s winter. It’s cold and wet. The roses are asleep. It’s going to be this way until some time in March.

This is the time of year I spend scheming all the things I’ll do when spring comes …. if spring ever comes.

Honestly, I just finished the last of my winter preparations this past weekend. We had a week without rain, so the ground dried enough to allow me to plant the last of my roses. The week before, the wind subsided enough for one day so I could get the ramblers attached to their new wire on the fence. I will have a How To article on the web site about training climbers and ramblers … as soon as I get a spare few hours to write it.

Updates here may not come as frequently as I would like … but that’s what happens when one writes a garden blog in the winter. As I hunker down for winter, with my down throw and an old American Rose Society annual, maybe I’ll share with you some of the tidbits I discover about the world of growing roses in the early 20th century. It’s very interesting reading.
Related Posts with Thumbnails